They’re growing – first expansion

WARNING: NSFW / graphic content below.

Goodbye ugly scab, hello first fill!

The scab that has been living on my left boob has finally fallen off! Can I get a “woo hoo”? It has been two full months since my prophylactic mastectomy on January 22 and the start of my adventure with resulting skin/nipple necrosis. Today I had my first fill. 50ccs of saline were injected into each tissue expander, bringing the total to 150ccs/side.

Tissue expanderWhat are tissue expanders, you ask? The type of breast reconstruction I chose is two-staged: tissue expanders first, followed by silicone breast implants. The tissue expanders, which were implanted underneath my pectoralis major muscle during the mastectomy, get filled with saline on a regular basis to stretch said muscle and the skin that covers it, until the desired volume is reached. They are like “pre-implants.” Similar shape, but more rigid, unnatural, and uncomfortable. They have a round magnetic port in the top half, which allows for insertion of a needle, without compromising the expander.

Breast Reconstruction Guidebook Figure 7.1

The process of filling the tissue expanders is pretty quick and uneventful. First the nurse uses a little plastic contraption with a metal pin at the end to find the magnetic port in the tissue expander. Once the center of the port is identified, the nurse sanitizes the area and injects the needle attached to a syringe holding the saline. She then slowly pushes the plunger until all 50ccs of fluid have been injected into the expander. This takes less than one minute. After completing the fill, she places a little round band-aid over the injection site. Same story on the other side.

This procedure is overall painless (based on just the first fill). The only sensation was a brief sting as the needle was inserted into the port through the skin.Three hours later, I feel a little bit of that now-familiar pressure on the muscle and skin stretched over the expanders. As soon as I got home, I popped an ibuprofen, did some stretches, and smeared my chest with Palmer’s cocoa butter oil.

As I look down at my chest, I can see that my foobs are bigger. It is a small difference, but it’s there. It will be interesting to watch these things grow. I can already tell that it won’t be pretty. The expanders didn’t settle exactly the same way: one sits higher and the other one is a bit twisted. The asymmetry seems to be normal based on my plastic surgeon’s feedback and the photos other women have shared. Enjoy the visual!

Fills 2013_3_29

100 + 50 = 150ccs

The fills will continue every two weeks at 50ccs/side. At this point, I have not yet decided how big I want to go (one of my friends joked: “go big or go home!”). However, I did find out that my breast surgeon removed 184 grams of breast tissue/side, which translates to roughly 184ccs, so one more fill and I will be back to pre-op size. Next appointment: April 12.

Source of Figure 7.1: Steligo, Kathy. Breast Reconstruction Guidebook: Issues and Answers from Research to Recovery. Maryland: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2012. Print, third edition.

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5 thoughts on “They’re growing – first expansion

  1. LiseyBendy

    Thank you, this is really informative. My expander had to fill just 148cc so I won’t be expanded at all which made me laugh and saved me a lot of long drives to the surgeon. Theses expanded are uncomfortable though. I am 9 weeks post mastectomy now and it feels like a spaceship complete with small bubbles and lumps on the side. I’ve got lots of treatment ahead. And a second mastectomy but look toward to exchange surgery down the track if I don’t have complications from radio. Anyway, I just wanted to say thanks for posting this info. Good luck with your expansion.

    Reply
    1. Mogatos Post author

      Thanks. Yes, spaceship is a good word for an expander. They are so unnatural!

      Fingers crossed that you have an uneventful and speed-bump-free journey.

      Reply
  2. Pingback: They’re back | Saying NOPE to Breast Cancer

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